Property tax

The Town of Mount Royal property bill is sent early in the year.

In 2019, it will be posted on January 22. A first instalment is due on February 21 and a second on May 22. Read our most recent folder about property taxes; you will find it in the documents associated to this page.

Town property tax rate (2019)

Property tax rate per $100 of assessment by category of property:

  • Residual: 0.7294
  • Six units or more: 0.7294
  • Non-residential: 3.0708
  • Industrial: 3.0708
  • Serviced vacant lot: 1.4588

Agglomeration of Montreal property tax

Since January 1, 2009, thanks to Bill 22 (An act to amend various legislative provisions concerning the urban agglomeration of Montréal), property owners now receive a single tax bill; the Town of Mount Royal tax bill includes an aliquot share to cover the costs of the agglomeration services.

Tax rate history

Should you wish to view tax rates from the past years, you will find a comprehensive table in the documents associated to this page.

Terms of payment

  • Option of paying in 2 equal instalments
    In accordance with the Act respecting Municipal Taxation (R.S.Q., Chapter F-2.1) and Town legislation, if the total amount of municipal taxes included in one bill is $300 or more, you may pay in two equal instalments.
  • Option of paying in a single instalment
    Needless to say, should you prefer it, you may also pay in a single instalment.

The first instalment is due 30 days after the tax bills have been sent out and the second instalment is due 90 days after the first instalment. Any instalment paid after the deadlines will result in adding interest charges and a penalty.

No recovery proceedings can be taken against a debtor who pays the instalments in compliance with the prescribed deadlines. When an instalment is not paid on time, only the amount of the overdue instalment is payable. The interest and penalty applicable to the municipal taxes then apply only to the amount of the overdue instalment.

In 2019, a first instalment is due on February 21 and a second on May 22.

Paying your tax bill: the electronic method (the safest option)

You can pay your tax bill and your water bill electronically by signing up for online banking services offered by most financial institutions.

To make your payment over the Internet, you must select the proper account payable, as the Town of Mount Royal has two separate accounts for payment of its property tax and of its water bills. Each account payable is clearly identified as such.

If you encounter any problems, please contact your financial institution’s Customer Service Department.

National Bank
Desjardins Movement
BMO Bank of Montreal
Scotiabank
RBC Royal Bank
CIBC
TD Canada Trust
HSBC Bank Canada

National Bank
Desjardins Movement
BMO Bank of Montreal
Scotiabank
TD Canada Trust

Paying your tax bill: the traditional method

At the Town Hall service counter (90 Roosevelt Avenue), you can pay in cash, by cheque made out to the Town of Mount Royal or by debit card.

By mail, please enclose the payment stub with your cheque. Please note that you cannot use a credit card to make your payment. Allow for sufficient delivery time because the payment will be credited to your account on the day of its receipt by the Town of Mount Royal, or on the date shown on the cheque if it is post-dated. Any payment received after the deadline will result in interest charges and a penalty.

All cheques must be written on a paper base provided by a Canadian or foreign financial institution, or obtained from a business specializing in cheque-printing. Furthermore, it must be drawn against an account at a branch operating in Canada.

Receive your tax bill electronically

Town of Mount Royal offers its residents the option of receiving their tax bill electronically. What’s more, Townies can also view their tax account online. If you choose to receive your next tax bill electronically, you will no longer receive your bill by surface mail: from then on, an email message will inform you that your new tax bill is available.

If you already have an Accès-Cité account

Sign in at mon.accescite.net/66072/en-ca. This is the same website used to register for recreational activities online and you should use the same identifiers and access codes.

Under the Tax Account tab, add your property using the information found on your paper tax bill:

  • Roll number
  • Account number
  • Amount of first payment
  • Check the “I agree to receive my tax bill only online” box.

You will then receive your tax bill electronically. You will also be able to view your tax account online whenever you want.

If you don’t have an Accès-Cité account

Go to mon.accescite.net/66072/en-ca and create your user account. Then follow the above instructions.

Duties on real estate transfers

Often called a “welcome tax,” a property transfer tax is an amount of money payable on the transfer of a property. The tax is paid by the acquirer of the property. For several years now, under section 12.1 of the Act respecting duties on transfers of immovables (CQLR, c. D‑15.1), transfer taxes have also been “exigible from any person who becomes an assignee of the immovable after the person who was a party to the transfer.” If there are two or more acquirers, they are jointly responsible for paying the taxes. Municipalities are required to collect transfer taxes on all property transfers in their territory.

Forms

What is a transfer of property?

A transfer is defined as:

  • the transfer of the right of ownership on a property between living persons or, following a death and bequest, the transfer of succession property and the sale of property by court order;
  • the contract of lease on a property, provided the term exceeds 40 years;
  • the establishment of emphyteusis and the transfer of the rights of the emphyteutic lessee.

Under the act, the basis for taxation is the greatest of the following amounts:

  • the amount actually paid for the transfer of the property;
  • the amount of the consideration established for the transfer of the property;
  • the market value of the property at the time of its transfer.

Note that the market value is the value entered on the assessment roll multiplied by a comparative factor set by the Direction d’évaluation foncière and approved by the Ministère des Affaires municipales et de l’Habitation.

The comparative factors for Town of Mount Royal for the 2017, 2018 and 2019 fiscal years are:

  • Year 2017: 1.00
  • Year 2018: 1.01
  • Year 2019: 1.04

The following explanation of the factor will be found in the first paragraph of section 264 of the Act respecting municipal taxation:

“For each fiscal year for which the property assessment roll applies, the assessor shall establish the median proportion of the actual property value of the units of assessment to which the values entered on the roll correspond. The assessor shall also indicate the comparative factor of the roll, which is the inverse of the median proportion.”

How are transfer taxes calculated?

Effective January 1, 2018, the thresholds specified in the Act respecting duties on transfers of immovables are updated annually based on parameters set by the Ministère des Affaires municipales et de l’Habitation.

Below are the parameters used in calculating the transfer duties.

Parts of the basis of imposition and corresponding tax rates from January 1, 2018, to April 24, 2018

For the section of the tax base:

  • That does not exceed $50,400, the rate is 0.5%;
  • That exceeds $50,400 but does not exceed $251,800, the rate is 1%;
  • That exceeds $251,800, the rate is 1.5%.

Calculation example for a tax base of $1,100,000

  1. Multiply $50,400 by 0.5 % = $252
  2. Multiply $201,400 by 1 % = $2,014
  3. Multiply $848,200 by 1.5 %  = $12,723
  4. So, for a tax base of $1,100,000, the transfer duties amount to: $14,989.

Parts of the basis of imposition and corresponding tax rates from April 25, 2018, to December 31, 2018

For the section of the tax base:

  • That does not exceed $50,400, the rate is 0.5%;
  • That exceeds $50,400 but does not exceed $251,800, the rate is 1%;
  • That exceeds $251,800 but does not exceed $500,000, the rate is 1.5%.
  • That exceeds $500,000 but does not exceed $1,000,000, the rate is 2%.
  • That exceeds $1,000,000, the rate is 2.5%.

Calculation example for a tax base of $1,100,000

  1. Multiply $50,400 by 0.5 % = $252
  2. Multiply $201,400 by 1 % = $2,014
  3. Multiply $248,200 by 1.5 %  = $3,723
  4. Multiply $500,000 by 2 %  = $10,000
  5. Then, multiply $100,000 by 2.5 %  = $2,500
  6. So, for a tax base of $1,100,000, the transfer duties amount to: $18,489

Parts of the basis of imposition and corresponding tax rates from January 1, 2019, to January 29, 2019

For the section of the tax base:

  • That does not exceed $50,900, the rate is 0.5%;
  • That exceeds $50,900 but does not exceed $254,400, the rate is 1%;
  • That exceeds $254,400 but does not exceed $500,000, the rate is 1.5%.
  • That exceeds $500,000 but does not exceed $1,000,000, the rate is 2%.
  • That exceeds $1,000,000, the rate is 2.5%.

Calculation example for a tax base of $1,100,000

  1. Multiply $50,900 by 0.5 % = $254.50
  2. Multiply $203,500 by 1 % = $2,035
  3. Multiply $245,600 by 1.5 % = $3,684
  4. Multiply $500,000 by 2 % = $10,000
  5. Then, multiply $100,000 by 2.5 % = $2,500
  6. So, for a tax base of $1,100,000, the transfer duties amount to: $18,473.50

Parts of the basis of imposition and corresponding tax rates starting January 30, 2019

For the section of the tax base:

  • That does not exceed $50,900, the rate is 0.5%;
  • That exceeds $50,900 but does not exceed $254,400, the rate is 1%;
  • That exceeds $254,400 but does not exceed $508,700, the rate is 1.5%.
  • That exceeds $508,700 but does not exceed $1,017,400 the rate is 2%.
  • That exceeds $1,017,400, the rate is 2.5%.

Calculation example for a tax base of $1,100,000

  1. Multiply $50,900 by 0.5 % = $254.50
  2. Multiply $203,500 by 1 % = $2,035
  3. Multiply $254,300 by 1.5 % = $3,814.50
  4. Multiply $508,700 by 2 % = $10,174
  5. Then, multiply $82,600 by 2.5 % = $2,065
  6. So, for a tax base of $1,100,000, the transfer duties amount to: $18,343

How is the mailing address for the transfer duties bill determined?

Town of Mount Royal sends the transfer tax bill to the residential address shown on the certificate issued by the assessor. All further correspondence (tax bill, reminder, etc.) will also be sent to this address. We therefore recommend that you notify us as soon as possible of any change of address. Note that not having notified the Town of a change of address cannot be used as justification for a late payment (due to not having received the transfer tax bill).

Special case: properties not registered in the land register

Some property transfers may not be entered in the land register. However, even if the transfer has not been published, the acquirers nonetheless have to pay the resulting transfer taxes. In such cases, the transferee is required to disclose, in the 90 days following the date of the transfer, the related information using the Divulgation transferts d'immeubles form (available in French only). The completed form should be sent to Town of Mount Royal accompanied by a copy of the bill of sale and the secret mandate, if applicable. The Town will then issue a transfer tax bill. Failure to duly disclose an unregistered transfer is punishable by a financial penalty that is added to the transfer tax initially payable; interest may also be charged and added to the amount due.

Taxpayers with questions can email us at treasurer@town.mount-royal.qc.ca.

Exemption

An acquirer may be exempted from paying the transfer tax in cases specified in the Act respecting duties on transfers of immovables (CQLR, c. D 15.1). For the acquirer to qualify for the transfer tax exemption provided by law, the notary must add wording to the effect in the bill of sale (or deed of transfer).

The main situations that qualify the acquirer for an exemption are:

  • Transfer to an ascendant or descendant in the direct line (sale from father to son, from grandmother to her granddaughter, etc.);
  • Transfer made by a transferor who is a natural person (i.e. a physical person) to a transferee that is a legal person (i.e. a company) if, immediately after the transfer, the transferor owns shares of the capital stock of the transferee carrying at least 90% of the voting rights that may be exercised under any circumstances at the annual meeting of shareholders of the transferee. This applies when a taxpayer transfers his or her property to his or her company;
  • Transfer between spouses, be they married or in a civil or de facto union (as defined in the Act respecting duties on transfers of immovables). Same-sex spouses are covered by this provision of the act.

Note that to qualify for the exemption, de facto spouses who separate due to the breakdown of their union have 12 months after their separation in which to execute the transfer, beyond which the transfer is no longer exempt. For their part, married and civil union spouses have 30 days after the date of their judgement of divorce in which to execute the transfer if the judgement of divorce did not assign the property to either of the spouses.

For some exemptions, the act provides that the conditions that qualify the transfer for the exemption must remain in effect for a specified time after the transfer. This means the exemption can be retroactively cancelled if, at any point during the period, the conditions that initially qualified the transferee for the exemption are no longer met. In particular, this would be the case when a legal person transferee was exempted from paying a transfer tax due to the transferor’s having held at least 90% of the voting rights. In other words, a shareholder can make a transfer to a company that he/she controls with at least 90% of the voting shares provided this shareholder remains the holder of these voting rights that qualified his/her company for the exemption and remains so for the entire period specified in the act, namely 24 months following the transfer. The transferee is required to disclose the cessation of the exemption using the Notice of disclosure from a transferee who no longer meets the conditions for exemption from the payment of transfer duties, failing which the transferee will be billed not only the transfer tax due but also a penalty and possibly interest. A second form, made of appendices, is available to provide extra information regarding additional transferors, transferees or authorized persons, or transferred movables. The completed forms should be sent to Town of Mount Royal. The other exemptions that remain in effect for a specified time period mainly concern transfers between related legal persons or between a legal person and a natural person who is its controlling shareholder.

Taxpayers with questions can email us at treasurer@town.mount-royal.qc.ca.